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653,650 cases in Ohio; 250,280 in Kentucky; 488,180 in Indiana

The COVID-19 outbreak is continuing to change everyday life for millions of Americans. Leaders across the county, including the Tri-State area, are providing daily updates on confirmed cases, deaths and measures taking to curb the spread of the virus. Here, you can get the latest information on the coronavirus in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana as well as resources to be prepared and keep your family safe.LATEST CASE NUMBERS: Ohio, 653,650, 8,456 deaths | Kentucky, 250,280, 2,466 deaths | Indiana, 488,180, 7,431 deathsEducational resources: CLICK HERE to access online learning resourcesCORONAVIRUS IN OHIOThe state of Ohio has laid out its latest vaccination plans, saying adults over the age of 65 and school staff will be among the next to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.Speaking during a press briefing Wednesday afternoon, the governor detailed who will be able to receive the critical vaccine next."The next broad category of people eligible to be vaccinated will be older Ohioans age 65," the governor said. "This chart shows that these Ohioans make up just under 87% of COVID-19 deaths in Ohio. We are still working to determine the logistics of how the vaccines will be distributed." In addition to older adults, the state will also begin offering vaccines to younger people with severe inherited or developmental disorders that make them particularly vulnerable — like Sickle Cell or Down Syndrome.Although an exact timeline has not been laid out, the governor said he hopes to get the next group vaccinated as soon as new shipments arrive.Additionally, the governor said the vaccine will also be made available to schools in hopes of getting children back in the classroom."Our kids are our future. It is our priority to get all of Ohio’s children in grades K-12 back in the classroom for in-person learning," the governor said. "We will make the vaccine available to the schools to accomplish the goal of getting kids back to class."The state will offer vaccines to all schools that want to go back, or to remain, in person. All staff members in the schools -- teachers, bus drivers, etc. -- would have the ability to get a vaccine.Although a timeline is not definitive, the governor said the goal is to start this phase around the middle of January, and have children back in the classroom by March.“Everyone in Ohio who wants this vaccine will – at some point – be able to get it,” the governor said. “It just can’t all happen now.”Right now, the vaccine is being provided to a limited number of Ohioans. Included in the first phase includes:Health care providers and personnel routinely involved with the care of COVID-19 patientsResidents and staff at nursing facilitiesResidents and staff at assisted living facilitiesResidents and staff at Ohio's veterans homesPatients and staff at psychiatric hospitalsPeople with intellectual disabilities and those who live with mental illness who live in group homes and their staffEMS respondersCORONAVIRUS IN KENTUCKYAfter another surge that preceded Thanksgiving raised concerns about the state's hospital capacity, Gov. Andy Beshear is beginning to sound more and more optimistic about the latest COVID-19 data ahead of another important holiday.Beshear said Kentucky's latest COVID-19 numbers have been trending better than they were a few weeks ago when he issued a new round of restrictions to curb the spread.Those restrictions hit businesses like restaurants hard again, but Beshear said they were necessary to prevent significant surges in new patients at hospitals. He was also concerned that gatherings over Thanksgiving would only cause even more surges. On Tuesday, during his final COVID-19 update ahead of Christmas, Beshear said Kentucky is doing much better compared to other parts of the country he said were "on fire."The governor said while hospitalization rates are escalating elsewhere, Kentucky is seeing downward trends. He said the stabilization in numbers is protecting the lives of people.Kentucky reported 3,057 new confirmed coronavirus cases and 28 virus-related deaths Tuesday. Beshear said those figures were about the same compared to the same day last week.Ahead of Christmas and New Year's, Beshear said he hopes people will continue doing their part to continue to apparent plateau in COVID-19 figures.More than 7,000 Kentuckians, the vast majority of them health care workers in hospitals, have been vaccinated since Dec. 14. Front-line health care workers and long-term care residents will continue to receive vaccinations into February. The governor is hoping recent news about the vaccinations will remind people that a return to normal is getting closer, but that there is still a long way to go.Beshear said how people observe Christmas this year will be critical to protecting Kentuckians as more of the vaccines begin rolling out.The governor and other health officials are asking people to keep gatherings small and avoid any unnecessary travel.CORONAVIRUS IN INDIANAThe Indiana Department of Health announced Friday that 5,563 additional Hoosiers have been diagnosed with COVID-19 through testing at state and private laboratories. That brings to 488,180 the number of Indiana residents now known to have had the novel coronavirus following corrections to the previous day's dashboard.A total of 7,431 Hoosiers are confirmed to have died from COVID-19, an increase of 40 from the previous day. Another 339 probable deaths have been reported based on clinical diagnoses in patients for whom no positive test is on record. Deaths are reported based on when data are received by the state and occurred over multiple days. To date, 2,586,165 unique individuals have been tested in Indiana, up from 2,572,545 on Thursday. A total of 5,484,835 tests, including repeat tests for unique individuals, have been reported to the state Department of Health since Feb. 26.Symptoms:According to the CDC, the following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure: Fever, cough and shortness of breath.Emergency warning signs include:Difficulty breathing or shortness of breathPersistent pain or pressure in the chestNew confusion or inability to arouseBluish lips or face*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.This chart from Prospect Pediatrics compares COVID-19 symptoms to the cold and flu:Resources: - Ohio coronavirus hotline: 833-427-5634- Kentucky coronavirus hotline: (800) 722-5725- Indiana general questions can be directed to the ISDH Epidemiology Resource Center at 317-233-7125 (317-233-1325 after hours) or e-mail [email protected] for Disease Control and Prevention websiteWhat to do if you think you have it:Officials have urged people to be conscious not to overwhelm the health care system. This graphic will help you decide when it is time to see a physician. Helpful tips and guides: → Here's what you should do if you already have the coronavirus → Dealing with stress, anxiety during coronavirus outbreak→ These viral social media coronavirus posts are FALSE→ How long should you wash your hands to avoid the coronavirus?→ Guidance for self isolation and home quarantine→ How to clean your car for coronavirus→ A guide to keeping your child safe and reassured as coronavirus spreads→ This map tracks the coronavirus in real time→ How to work from home without losing your sanity

The COVID-19 outbreak is continuing to change everyday life for millions of Americans. Leaders across the county, including the Tri-State area, are providing daily updates on confirmed cases, deaths and measures taking to curb the spread of the virus.

Here, you can get the latest information on the coronavirus in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana as well as resources to be prepared and keep your family safe.

LATEST CASE NUMBERS: Ohio, 653,650, 8,456 deaths | Kentucky, 250,280, 2,466 deaths | Indiana, 488,180, 7,431 deaths

Educational resources: CLICK HERE to access online learning resources

CORONAVIRUS IN OHIO

The state of Ohio has laid out its latest vaccination plans, saying adults over the age of 65 and school staff will be among the next to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

Speaking during a press briefing Wednesday afternoon, the governor detailed who will be able to receive the critical vaccine next.

"The next broad category of people eligible to be vaccinated will be older Ohioans age 65," the governor said. "This chart shows that these Ohioans make up just under 87% of COVID-19 deaths in Ohio. We are still working to determine the logistics of how the vaccines will be distributed."

.

In addition to older adults, the state will also begin offering vaccines to younger people with severe inherited or developmental disorders that make them particularly vulnerable — like Sickle Cell or Down Syndrome.

Although an exact timeline has not been laid out, the governor said he hopes to get the next group vaccinated as soon as new shipments arrive.

Additionally, the governor said the vaccine will also be made available to schools in hopes of getting children back in the classroom.

"Our kids are our future. It is our priority to get all of Ohio’s children in grades K-12 back in the classroom for in-person learning," the governor said. "We will make the vaccine available to the schools to accomplish the goal of getting kids back to class."

The state will offer vaccines to all schools that want to go back, or to remain, in person. All staff members in the schools -- teachers, bus drivers, etc. -- would have the ability to get a vaccine.

Although a timeline is not definitive, the governor said the goal is to start this phase around the middle of January, and have children back in the classroom by March.

“Everyone in Ohio who wants this vaccine will – at some point – be able to get it,” the governor said. “It just can’t all happen now.”

Right now, the vaccine is being provided to a limited number of Ohioans. Included in the first phase includes:

  • Health care providers and personnel routinely involved with the care of COVID-19 patients
  • Residents and staff at nursing facilities
  • Residents and staff at assisted living facilities
  • Residents and staff at Ohio's veterans homes
  • Patients and staff at psychiatric hospitals
  • People with intellectual disabilities and those who live with mental illness who live in group homes and their staff
  • EMS responders

CORONAVIRUS IN KENTUCKY

After another surge that preceded Thanksgiving raised concerns about the state's hospital capacity, Gov. Andy Beshear is beginning to sound more and more optimistic about the latest COVID-19 data ahead of another important holiday.

Beshear said Kentucky's latest COVID-19 numbers have been trending better than they were a few weeks ago when he issued a new round of restrictions to curb the spread.

Those restrictions hit businesses like restaurants hard again, but Beshear said they were necessary to prevent significant surges in new patients at hospitals. He was also concerned that gatherings over Thanksgiving would only cause even more surges.

On Tuesday, during his final COVID-19 update ahead of Christmas, Beshear said Kentucky is doing much better compared to other parts of the country he said were "on fire."

The governor said while hospitalization rates are escalating elsewhere, Kentucky is seeing downward trends. He said the stabilization in numbers is protecting the lives of people.

Kentucky reported 3,057 new confirmed coronavirus cases and 28 virus-related deaths Tuesday. Beshear said those figures were about the same compared to the same day last week.

Ahead of Christmas and New Year's, Beshear said he hopes people will continue doing their part to continue to apparent plateau in COVID-19 figures.

More than 7,000 Kentuckians, the vast majority of them health care workers in hospitals, have been vaccinated since Dec. 14. Front-line health care workers and long-term care residents will continue to receive vaccinations into February.

The governor is hoping recent news about the vaccinations will remind people that a return to normal is getting closer, but that there is still a long way to go.

Beshear said how people observe Christmas this year will be critical to protecting Kentuckians as more of the vaccines begin rolling out.

The governor and other health officials are asking people to keep gatherings small and avoid any unnecessary travel.

CORONAVIRUS IN INDIANA

The Indiana Department of Health announced Friday that 5,563 additional Hoosiers have been diagnosed with COVID-19 through testing at state and private laboratories. That brings to 488,180 the number of Indiana residents now known to have had the novel coronavirus following corrections to the previous day's dashboard.

A total of 7,431 Hoosiers are confirmed to have died from COVID-19, an increase of 40 from the previous day. Another 339 probable deaths have been reported based on clinical diagnoses in patients for whom no positive test is on record. Deaths are reported based on when data are received by the state and occurred over multiple days.

To date, 2,586,165 unique individuals have been tested in Indiana, up from 2,572,545 on Thursday. A total of 5,484,835 tests, including repeat tests for unique individuals, have been reported to the state Department of Health since Feb. 26.

Symptoms:

According to the CDC, the following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure: Fever, cough and shortness of breath.

Emergency warning signs include:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

This chart from Prospect Pediatrics compares COVID-19 symptoms to the cold and flu:

Resources:

- Ohio coronavirus hotline: 833-427-5634

- Kentucky coronavirus hotline: (800) 722-5725

- Indiana general questions can be directed to the ISDH Epidemiology Resource Center at 317-233-7125 (317-233-1325 after hours) or e-mail [email protected].

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website

What to do if you think you have it:

Officials have urged people to be conscious not to overwhelm the health care system. This graphic will help you decide when it is time to see a physician.

Helpful tips and guides:

→ Here's what you should do if you already have the coronavirus

→ Dealing with stress, anxiety during coronavirus outbreak

→ These viral social media coronavirus posts are FALSE

→ How long should you wash your hands to avoid the coronavirus?

Guidance for self isolation and home quarantine

→ How to clean your car for coronavirus

→ A guide to keeping your child safe and reassured as coronavirus spreads

→ This map tracks the coronavirus in real time

→ How to work from home without losing your sanity


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