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Ohio school teachers can’t carry firearms on duty unless they complete peace officer training


Ohio school teachers, administrators and staff members will not be allowed to carry a firearm while on duty unless they have peace officer training or 20 years of experience as a peace officer, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled Wednesday.In a 4-3 decision, the Supreme Court struck down a 2018 Madison Local School District policy that allowed employees to carry firearms as long as they met certain requirements including having a valid concealed carry license, complete at least 24 hours of active-shooter response training and pass a mental health exam, drug screening and criminal background check.The policy was enacted two years after a school shooting at Madison Junior-Senior High School that injured four students in 2016.A group of parents then sued the district to prevent teachers from being armed without extensive training more than 700 hours instead of 24 hours.The case eventually made it to the Supreme Court where oral arguments were heard earlier this year. Chief Justice Maureen O'Connor, who was joined by justices Michael P. Donnelly, Melody J. Stewart, and Jennifer Brunner, said a school employee must meet the training or experience requirements that apply to those persons employed by schools as special police officers or security guards if the employee "goes armed" during the time the employee is performing job duties, whatever those duties might be.Three justices, Sharon L. Kennedy, Patrick F. Fischer and R. Patrick DeWine, dissented the opinion.

Ohio school teachers, administrators and staff members will not be allowed to carry a firearm while on duty unless they have peace officer training or 20 years of experience as a peace officer, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled Wednesday.

In a 4-3 decision, the Supreme Court struck down a 2018 Madison Local School District policy that allowed employees to carry firearms as long as they met certain requirements including having a valid concealed carry license, complete at least 24 hours of active-shooter response training and pass a mental health exam, drug screening and criminal background check.

The policy was enacted two years after a school shooting at Madison Junior-Senior High School that injured four students in 2016.

A group of parents then sued the district to prevent teachers from being armed without extensive training more than 700 hours instead of 24 hours.

The case eventually made it to the Supreme Court where oral arguments were heard earlier this year.

Chief Justice Maureen O'Connor, who was joined by justices Michael P. Donnelly, Melody J. Stewart, and Jennifer Brunner, said a school employee must meet the training or experience requirements that apply to those persons employed by schools as special police officers or security guards if the employee "goes armed" during the time the employee is performing job duties, whatever those duties might be.

Three justices, Sharon L. Kennedy, Patrick F. Fischer and R. Patrick DeWine, dissented the opinion.


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