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Data shows US births fell during the pandemic

despite the pandemic being predicted as a catalyst for Covid burst, resulting in the birth of caroni als, a term described by Urban Dictionary as a generation born amidst the pandemic, the country's birth rate seems to have declined. The new York Times reports data has shown that births have declined by 4% resulting in a total of 3,605,201 births in the U. S. Over 2020. The lowest number since 1979 the federal government reported 2020 was the sixth straight year. The birth rate has declined, a surprising results, suggesting the pandemic has encouraged a trend among american women to delay pregnancy. Possible causes for the noticeable decline in births after an economic crisis could include job insecurity and income uncertainty. According to the new york times, births declined across all age groups in 2020 except among women in their late forties and girls in their early teens, the declining birth rate is just one piece of America's shifting demographic picture, slowing population growth alongside a higher death rate and immigration.

CDC data shows US births fell during the pandemic


The number of births in the United States fell by 4% last year, much of it likely due to the pandemic, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.It's "the largest annual decline in the number of births since 1973," CDC researchers wrote in their report.Births had been falling by about 2% a year already, but 2020 brought a greater decline, the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics reported.CDC researchers counted 3.6 million births in 2020, based on provisional data. That's a decrease from about 3.75 million births in 2019 and 3.8 million births in 2018.In the first half of 2020, births were down 2% and the number of births fell even more in the second half of 2020, with births down 4% in July, 7% in August, 4% in September, 6% in October and November, and 8% in December, the researchers found.The coronavirus pandemic paired with an ongoing decline in U.S. births, has presented the "perfect storm" for an accelerated decrease in the number of babies born, said Dr. Rahul Gupta, chief medical and health officer for the maternal and infant health nonprofit March of Dimes."We already have a maternal and infant health crisis in our country. We already have disproportionality in terms of racial disparities," Gupta, who was not involved in the new CDC report, told CNN."So, what this particular report points to is something we should take really seriously, which is: Is this decline going to have demographic impacts in the future? And that there will be both impacts in terms of workforce, in terms of economy, in terms of diversity, and population?" Gupta asked. "And obviously what happened in 2020, it will probably happen again at least in 2021."The number of births declined for all states and Washington, DC, in the second half of last year compared with the same period in 2019.The states with the largest declines in births for the second half of 2020 were: New Mexico, New York, California, Hawaii, and West Virginia. Declines were not seen as significant in seven states: Idaho, Maine, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wyoming.The researchers also found some racial disparities. From 2019 to 2020, declines in the numbers of births each month were greater among women of color compared with white women."Evaluation of trends in births by month will continue to determine whether these declines continued into 2021 or were unique to 2020 during the time of the initial COVID-19 pandemic," the researchers wrote.

The number of births in the United States fell by 4% last year, much of it likely due to the pandemic, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

It's "the largest annual decline in the number of births since 1973," CDC researchers wrote in their report.

Births had been falling by about 2% a year already, but 2020 brought a greater decline, the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics reported.

CDC researchers counted 3.6 million births in 2020, based on provisional data. That's a decrease from about 3.75 million births in 2019 and 3.8 million births in 2018.

In the first half of 2020, births were down 2% and the number of births fell even more in the second half of 2020, with births down 4% in July, 7% in August, 4% in September, 6% in October and November, and 8% in December, the researchers found.

The coronavirus pandemic paired with an ongoing decline in U.S. births, has presented the "perfect storm" for an accelerated decrease in the number of babies born, said Dr. Rahul Gupta, chief medical and health officer for the maternal and infant health nonprofit March of Dimes.

"We already have a maternal and infant health crisis in our country. We already have disproportionality in terms of racial disparities," Gupta, who was not involved in the new CDC report, told CNN.

"So, what this particular report points to is something we should take really seriously, which is: Is this decline going to have demographic impacts in the future? And that there will be both impacts in terms of workforce, in terms of economy, in terms of diversity, and population?" Gupta asked. "And obviously what happened in 2020, it will probably happen again at least in 2021."

The number of births declined for all states and Washington, DC, in the second half of last year compared with the same period in 2019.

The states with the largest declines in births for the second half of 2020 were: New Mexico, New York, California, Hawaii, and West Virginia. Declines were not seen as significant in seven states: Idaho, Maine, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wyoming.

The researchers also found some racial disparities. From 2019 to 2020, declines in the numbers of births each month were greater among women of color compared with white women.

"Evaluation of trends in births by month will continue to determine whether these declines continued into 2021 or were unique to 2020 during the time of the initial COVID-19 pandemic," the researchers wrote.


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